The Conversation Prism by Brian Solis and JESS3

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The Content Grid

It’s a simple framework for content — or “inbound” — marketing.  That is, it plots content type and distribution channel across two dimensions: who should create it (a single owner or the entire staff) and how it should be distributed for maximum impact on the sales funnel.

via New Content Marketing Infographic: “The Content Grid”

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The Web Data Revolution


Data revolution brought with it the risk of confusion, misinterpretation and inaccessibility. How do you know where to look? What is credible or up to date? Official documents are often published as uneditable pdf files for example – useless for analysis except in ways already done by the organisation itself.

@Simon Rogers:
The new world will be a place of answers and no questions, because the only questions left will be answered by computers, because only computers will know what to ask. 
Technical skills and design needed but can be built upon. Not all data is interesting. Need to have a nose for data to learn what will be good for a data driven story. Raw data is just numbers without the design to make it beautiful.

@David McCandless:
You need to see patterns and connections that matter in the data. You need to orientate your audience, take them on a journey. Data is abstract. You need to contextualize to understand what it means. Need to make it relevant. If you make it beautiful/interesting everyone will love it.  We’re saturated with data. Data is the new soil. Visualizations are the earthy blossoms!

@Richard Pope:
These are early days but we can see that journalism is changing.

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http://player.vimeo.com/video/16436396

Turtle is a software that allows following the development of a controversial issue in the media space, collecting and displaying information and the documents spread the various actors involved in it. The project aims at enhancing the exploration of news and document spread over long periods of time.

With adequate tools the traces of a controversy emerge and they can be observed. This data gathering process finds in the Internet a precious box, which contains the elements to reassemble the network and the dynamics of a controversy. Turtle, from a technological point of view, posits itself above information and discursive flows developed over the Internet. It is made up by a series of tools and devices able to explore controversies and could be defined as an observation environment of the discursive fragments flowing through the Internet.

Density Design | Turtle

Big Data, Small Startups: One Angle On Turning Data Into Money


Thanks to commodity computing power, it’s possible to build a startup business based around big data and analytics. But what does it take to do this, and how can you make money? 

It’s no surprise that in the time since Varian’s opining (2008), we’ve seen oodles of small startups setting their sights to capitalize on Big Data. And now, we’re learning from their failures. But Big Data doesn’t need to be the place bright startups go to die. After a number of startup breakups with El Data Grande, Pete Warden came up with a tangible analysis of what the path is from stacks to riches.How To Turn Data Into Money is one way to approach a complex topic in a landscape of changing tools, and it’s well worth a look. He describes the process of identifying how to make data turn a profit. Warden reinforces the notion that we’re still in the early days of really knowing where the ‘big wins’ are with Big Data.

The overall issue is this: From the outlay, many startups are going to be sitting on a large bucket of data but won’t be in a position to imediately know where the monetization sweet spot lies. As Warden suggests, they will have to go through a series of processes that enables them to zero in on how to provide the maximum amount of value by iterating in partnership with their customers/users.

The first step might be to summarize the data and provide simple graphs. This allows everyone, your customers and your own team, to really understand what the data might show.

As feedback is obtained from this initial process, key metrics and other indicators can be focused on in reports. This will begin to allow you to answer specific questions that will (hopefully) be of value to your customers.

It’s no surprise that your customers, once identified, are going to be where you go for answers to their needs. Iterating your business in response to working with your customers – which is always valuable no matter what vertical you are in – will ultimately bring you to a point where you can provide business intelligence and actionable recommendations for your customers based on what they are already doing with the data.

Being able to point out specific trends, suggestions and points of friction (contextual to your data’s domain) should be of great value and something your current and future customers will be willing to pay for.

Finally, Warden touches on how your shiny data should be presented – dashboards are commonplace, but clearly we’re in very early days in this space. What’s important to remember is that what’s being built here is a combination of product and consultation. If you need an initial framework to begin tackling the problem Warden’s post works as a great framework, but given that Big Data could be about anything, you will need to consider your domain space, the nature of the data and your own expertise to be able to know whether this will work for you.

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